Why Linking Is So Important In Any SEO Strategy

In order to achieve success in the organic searches, there are some rules that should be followed. Many people think that SEO is about submitting as much content as they can or they haven’t a clue and it’s all jiggery pokery.

The first think you need to do, is to take a good look at your website. Your website is the first point of call for many customers and if it doesn’t tell them much or isn’t well laid out, they won’t hang around, they will go off to one of your competitors. Make sure that your site has relevant, high quality unique content that provides information that the visitor wants. It is important that you have a wide selection of relevant keywords interspersed in the text and that all your tags contain at least 1 relevant keyword. Every page on your website needs to have a suitable title that reflects what the page is about.

Take a good look at the sort of phrases that people are using when they make a search for the products or services you sell. This is a significant factor and it is why you must do a thorough keyword research project before you implement your SEO strategy. If you are using keywords and key phrases that people are using when they perform a search, you are more likely to appear in the search results.

Linking is still very important and the number of links to relevant highly rated sites is more important than ever today. The number of inbound links your site has will be a factor in its ranking on the search engines. If you compare your site to a celebrity, the more you are talked about, the more popular you become. When the people talking about you are important, this means that some of that importance rubs off onto you. The number of important websites that refer to your site is what determines how important the search engines consider it to be.

The quantity or inbound links isn’t enough to get you noticed, the links have to be good quality. What this means is that the sites containing links to your site, need to be relevant to your niche and be important themselves. They need to rank as highly or higher than yours on the search engines. As such, these links are very valuable.

Social media has its place, after all, if you have written a piece for your blog and millions of people are liking and sharing it, then it must be good. The think with social media is that it does require work and it is only one part of an SEO strategy, it cannot be the only thing you do to promote your business.

Video is a becoming more popular and businesses should consider making use of it as another string to their bow. The videos can be as serious or light hearted as you want however, they must be in keeping with the type of business you run. It would not be appropriate for a serious business to be producing silly videos, this does not mean that they can’t show the lighter side of that business but anyone looking for those particular services are probably wanting to see something informative and straightforward.

There are many facets to SEO and lots of people think that they can beat the search engines by taking short cuts, this will I’m afraid only lead to disaster. There are no shortcuts, this is why Google has developed and continues to fine tune its algorithms.


Landing high-quality backlinks from within your local community to aid your SEO effort is an important consideration for any small business, and a topic I’ve written about before. But the problem is, many local business owners assume all links are created equal, and that’s not the case at all.

In fact, this misconception often leads businesses to SEO firms that deliver what those businesses initially wanted — links — but in the long run the low quality and spammy links they receive cause more harm than good.

When local business owners receive a $500 monthly quote from one SEO consultant and a $2,000 monthly quote from another, the difference may seem to be $1,500 — but more is at stake here, because there aren’t any push-button solutions. What’s needed is a combination of outreach and relationship-building, and this takes time as well as experience.

So, to secure high-quality links, even with a limited budget, first understand what a high-quality link is by targeting backlinks with the following characteristics:

  • They’ll be seen by potential customers and therefore drive targeted referral traffic back to your website.
  • They have high-quality metrics, which will help increase your website’s authority.
  • They help improve your company’s image — so seek only link opportunities from websites you want your business to be associated with.

Now, here are five sources of links that are of high quality for your local SEO effort — and valuable as such, because links are the most influential ranking factor in Google’s algorithm.

1. The Better Business Bureau

This is a link any local business can acquire, as long as it meets the requirements to be an accredited member of your local BBB. A regular BBB listing doesn’t include an outbound link in the listing, while an accredited one does.

Even though there is an annual fee for that status, the benefits exceed just links. A coaching client told me, “I don’t really want to pay over $500 for a link,” but then I explained the additional benefits: credibility, trust and the reality that many consumers still make decisions based on whether or not a company is accredited by the BBB.

The added benefits beyond a link are particularly important for service-related businesses, such as plumbers, contractors, electricians and landscapers.

2. Local media

Local media outlets provide an abundant source of link opportunities. Imagine if you owned a local home-security company and your area was experiencing a large enough number of home invasions to warrant a news report. As soon as you see local media pick that story up, you should be contacting them with an offer to provide content for their website and information for their broadcast.

By staying connected with local media, you get a nice link and valuable branding and advertising for free. Even if you can’t watch the local news daily, give media websites a daily scan and be alert to what is happening in your area.

Another opportunity exists, beyond a breaking news story that relates to your business. Using the same home-security company example, you might consider contacting local media outlets and saying, “I own XYZ home security, and we just put together a 10-step home security checklist that I think would greatly benefit the community. Would you like me to send it over so you can put it on your website?” Most local outlets would take you up on the offer.

3. Local schools and nonprofits

Local schools and nonprofits often have sponsorship opportunities that highlight all donors on a dedicated page of their website. If you spend a couple of hours searching for these, you can typically uncover amazing link opportunities.

Find local school websites with Google, and use GuideStar to identify local charities and nonprofits to explore further. Even if a particular website doesn’t have a donor page, it never hurts to ask. A quick phone call or email can reveal opportunities that will cost as little as a $10-to-$25 donation.

4. Local partners and suppliers

The first thing I do when I work with a local business is to ask for a list of its suppliers. So, a restaurant’s list for example, will often include local produce companies, butchers and supply companies. These are established relationships — sometimes decades old — which makes the request easier, since it’s an established relationship. A simple, “Hey, since we have been working together for so long, we would love your listing us as one of your preferred buyers” can often be all that’s needed to secure a nice link.

Read more: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/250794

The World of SEO Can Be Confusing

The World of Search Engine Optimisation is one that can, at times, be very confusing, and some recent reading has made the situation that bit more difficult to understand.

The document in question was published by BuzzSumo and was a detailed piece of research into the relationship between the number of links and shares that content on the web gained.

SEO - A Confusing World

The reason for my ‘confusion’ is the fact that in SEO circles, it is a well published ‘fact’ that web pages get good rankings because they are not only ‘good quality’ but also because of the links and the shares they gain. This seemed totally logical to me and I have always striven to create useful articles for our clients and to ensure that they get links and shares (some of which I will confess to be ‘created’, this being a part of  the well established SEO practice of ‘priming the pump’).

BuzzSumo Research Quote:-

What we found is that the majority of content published on the internet is simply ignored when it comes to shares and links. The data suggests most content is simply not worthy of sharing or linking. It also suggests that people are very poor at amplifying content. It may sound harsh but it seems most people are wasting their time either producing poor content or failing to amplify it.

However, the data in this article suggests that the majority of content published on the web is simply ignored, at least when it comes to shares and links. If this is true and I have no reason to doubt the statistics, it would mean that a huge percentage of pages (75% if the data is correct) have no links to them at all, and only 50% having any Facebook shares or likes. Thus if Google is using these factors to rank pages, for these pages (with no links and few shares) it has to do so without the benefit of any links or shares and the ‘this page is of value signal that they represent’.

This is important in my view as a computer algorithm must find it difficult to rate a page on the basis of ‘usefulness’ or being ‘good’. Sure it can check the grammar and the length of the page, plus check on any links that are going out from the page (it is always a good idea to link to any ‘authoritative’  site / data), but how can it truly work out what is good? After all, such a decision is to some degree subjective, so whatever Google decides may in essence be wrong…

You could read this of course as a reason to ensure that any content you create does have links and shares, as this must ‘help’ Google (we certainly do our best to help Google all the time) to rate the page in question higher (because so much of the competition have no links or shares), but it also to my mind at least makes me continue to question the way that Google is said to rate a page.

The data also came to the conclusion that it was no surprise that pages got more shares than links, shares being much easier to acquire. Content it seems has to work very hard to get links..

The Answer to the SEO Conundrum

There is an answer to this conundrum in my view though, as it is my belief that pages are not actually viewed in isolation at all. Their content is surely checked and rated (as mentioned above) but then, and this is the important point, the Domain Authority of the site (and the power of the Home page) is taken into account.

I have seen this in action countless times, many a page that I have seen on the first page of Google, in reality having no ‘right’ to be there at all. It is only when you check on the power of the domain and the links that it has do you see why a page (that has no or few links to itself) has that front page placement.
This in turn means that what you must do, as a site owner (or SEO Professional) is to make sure that a site gets as many high power, relevant links as you can manage. That way, as long as you only produce good quality content you are more likely to get those coveted front page listings.

What Content Is Best for SEO?

As to what sort of content you should create IF you want it get those shares and links (which is bound to help), well it seems that Videos and Quizzes get more of both. However it must be said that it many cases this is because the video is ‘funny and entertaining’ and that a video of your latest product is not likely to stir up as much interest as ones that feature bears stealing fish (remember that JohnWest advert?).

Quizzes will also fall into the same group, the quizzes that really get great amounts of interests again not being ones that are relevant to many businesses, certainly many of the Corporate sites we deal with would not allow one of these ‘popular’ quizzes on their sites.

There are however two forms of content that gains lots of shares and links that would look good on many sites, these being ‘Opinion’ and ‘List Posts’. Of course these opinion posts need some thought and research, so perhaps the ‘List Post’ is the best route to take.

These List Posts are very much like they sound, in that the posts feature a list of points on a subject, often to explain in an easy manner a topic or a how to do something (How To Posts are also quite good at getting shares and links).

I will we carrying out some more research into this area in the near future and I will publish my findings as soon as I can.

Panda 4.2 – It’s not Running, It’s Walking…

Any site owner that is interested in SEO and the traffic that they get from it is always keeping a eye out for one of Google’s animals and for any effects.

Google Panda
Public Domain from pixabay

Carrying out this sort of monitoring is needed, as, without it, you could see a drop in traffic and not know why. Of course, you have to know which of the beasties is out and about and when they were ‘released’ if you are to do this.

In the past this was fine, but now it seems that Google’s Panda, once let out of its cage, did not ‘run’ as normal, but instead is walking, walking very very slowly. This is not good for anyone trying to work out if the drop (or rise) in their Oganic traffic has anything to do with Panda, as they simply cannot relate the change to the ‘release date’ of the Algorithim change.

This article explains the way that Panda 4.2 has been rolled out in more detail and is well worth a read.

On Wednesday, July 22nd, Barry Schwartz broke huge SEO news. Google finally started rolling out Panda 4.2, which we’ve been eagerly waiting for since 10/24/14. That was the last Panda update, which was over nine months ago at the time! That’s extremely unusual for Panda, which typically rolled out monthly (and even more frequently at certain times).

Google explained to Barry that Panda began rolling out the weekend prior (July 18th) and that this would be an extended rollout (which was also very strange). Then John Mueller explained in a webmaster hangout that the extended rollout was due to technical problems that Google was having with Panda. They didn’t want to push an extended update, but were forced to.

So according to Google, Panda 4.2 could take months to fully roll out.

I’ll be honest. I was completely shocked when I heard about the extended rollout. Panda usually rolled out quickly and sites that were impacted could easily identify the exact date of the impact.

One day, big impact, and easier to associate with a specific Panda update. Ah, those were the days.

Having a specific date makes it much easier for webmasters to understand what hit them, and then what to fix. With the extended rollout of Panda 4.2, sites could theoretically see impact right after 7/18, a few weeks from then, or even a few months out from 7/18. And with Google pushing hundreds of updates throughout the year (and over one thousand last year according to John Mueller), how are webmasters supposed to know if Panda impacted them, or if it was something else (like Phantom, Penguin, or any of the other updates Google rolls out during year)? Short answer: they can’t.

Is Your Online Presence Failing to Sell?: Here Are 4 Reasons Why

There is an old saying in that ‘you can bring the horse to water but you cannot make them drink’ and never has one been so accurate when talking about web traffic…


From an SEO or Social Media point of view, getting traffic to a site is the first big goal, but it has to be the right sort of traffic and then the site must do its job and get them to engage, taking a ‘sip’ if not a big gulp.

The Engagement Process

A part of this ‘engagement process’ is of course down to design, it has to appeal (very quickly) to the browser, or risk loosing them in those vital first seconds.

The next thing of course is the content of the page. Is it what the customer wants?, your Bounce Rates will tell you (and Google too if they come from a search) so need to be constantly rewiewed, just in case you are not doing things the way that your customers want, these after all being the final arbiter…

The site’s content and the way it approaches it’s customers is therefore key. It does not matter how many potential customers (horses) you deliver to a site if the ‘water’ does not look good and tasty.

Getting on the Customers Shortlist

But what is ‘tasty?’ A very good question and one that will change depending on what the site is about and where in the buying cycle your customer is. The article below covers this in one of it’s points saying in effect that those who are just starting in their quest are looking for very general data and thus don’t want the full nine words on your product / service, but just an initial description. If you get on their shortllist they will be back..

Besides the issue of good ‘useful’ content, there is the matter of Re-Engagement. This is another topic and one that we will come back too in the future, but it is important as just because the visitor does not buy today, does not mean that they might not buy tomorrow, so keeping in contact and reminding them that you are there waiting to serve them, is a good idea.

For the full article on Why your site is not converting, please click the link.

The cheese moved. The buying process has changed. Technology to support and further that change continues to grow and evolve. Communicating through the vast array of digital channels (website, SEM, social, email) is no longer an option. It is a must-do.

The online presence of your business must attract and convert prospects. It must engage with leads through a variety of channels as users travel through a longer and more complex buying cycle.

How we market and communicate online has come a long way from static, brochure-like internet pages and “spray-and-pray” email blasts. Unfortunately, for many, online marketing is still failing to reach its full potential.

Pointing a finger at the underlying technology would be easy, e.g., marketing automation, content management systems or any of the tools and solutions laid out in Scott Brinker’s Marketing Technology Super Graphic.

It’s easy to say the technology is failing, so the marketing effort is failing. But the reality is more complex. Here are four of the biggest reasons why your online presence is failing to drive sales.

Engagement For The Wrong Reasons

Using engagement tactics that are not aligned with business goals is a huge waste of time and money. Too often, I see engagement for engagement’s sake. This results in leads stagnated in the buying cycle and low-volume sales funnels.

Having a high number of Twitter followers or a successful content syndication program is great, but that is not success.

CMOs are being judged on sales. And following your brand or downloading an asset is not a sale.

Social followers matter. They are your advocates. They can extend your message.

But focusing on the number of followers and not their engagement and conversion ratios results in negative ROI for the money spent to generate them. It also takes the marketing eye off the important goal of a sale.

Weak Commitment To Prospects

Generating new leads through content syndication or SEM is the start of the buyer’s journey. Most leads are not ready to buy at that point.

So not using retargeting or nurture programs to bring them back for further communication is a waste of the money spent to find them to begin with.

When they fail to travel along the pipeline because they are left to rot somewhere between the marketing and sales organization, it reflects negatively on the organization.

Lack Of Good Content

Everywhere I look, the numbers show an increase in content marketing spend and usage. Businesses are spending millions to have content developed — to tell their story, engage with their prospects, and help convert their leads through the buying cycle.

And yet much of what is used to attract and engage leads is sales enablement content. It’s all about features and functions. Or it’s focused on selling something, rather than trying to educate.

Take, for example, the content used in top-of-funnel nurture programs. More times than I care to remember, I’ve seen programs use 45-minute product webinars or 20-page product briefs.

Breakdown happens when leads don’t engage, and the prospects in the funnel dry up. This is because leads in the early buying cycle don’t want to know everything about the product, and they don’t want to be sold to. Rather, they want to know what the options are and what to consider as they do their research.

Marketing Teams Are Not Living In The Now

Stagnating means not going to where your customers are by using better ways and different channels to communicate with them online. It results in low communication. And poor communication results in low sales.

Searches And Mobiles, What’s The Plan?

Google’s new algorithm is aimed at sifting through mobile searches. These days most people use their mobile phones to perform searches on the internet. If your site is not optimised for mobile, you will not rank so it is important to make sure that your website is accessible on any device. What this means is that searches performed on mobiles are going to be provided primarily with a list of sites that are mobile friendly. Recent research has shown that there is a high number of high profile sites that are not compatible with mobile devices.

The average person will not notice the changes but for those companies who have not been able to get themselves sorted, they will be affected by these changes and will find themselves either sliding down the rankings or not appearing at all. The number of searches on computers has decreased significantly so it really does make perfect sense to make life easier for visitors to your site who are using mobiles.

There is another reason for these changes taking place, the behaviour of people. Those who perform a search for a particular product on their Smartphone are more likely to be wanting to make a purchase. Often, mobile searches are not looking to research the products rather, they have often done this beforehand on their PCs so are ready to buy.

With the numbers of mobile searches, making your website mobile-friendly is in fact more important than performing SEO. The whole point of the new algorithm is to ensure that the right search results are provided regardless of the device being used. The easier the access, the more likely it is that a purchase will be made there and then. So, if the visitor can make their purchase quickly and easily, it will affect businesses who have failed to adapt.

It is important to keep up with all the changes that are taking place so that you are not concentrating on doing things that are perhaps not quite as relevant as they once were. For instance, where unique high content was the key to attracting search engine attention, there is a bit of a shift towards compatibility and how user friendly the site is. This does not however, mean that you can forget about providing quality content, this is still an very important aspect of SEO but you need to balance the user’s experience as well. Having a content rich website is still a main goal but do make sure that your site is accessible on a variety of devices so that you do not miss out on all that potential business being done via mobile devices.


Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales once reportedly said: “If it isn’t on Google, it doesn’t exist”.

While statements like this may be best left on the sun-blessed coffee shop terraces of Silicon Valley, as far as brand and business awareness is concerned, it isn’t far wrong.

The numbers are staggering. Google currently accounts for 88 % of the UK’s search engine market. It processes an average of over 40,000 global search queries every second, 3.5bn searches per day and 1.2tn searches per year worldwide.

On the web, sole traders can in theory compete with the corporate big boys, so being able to be found – and found easily – among those searches is essential for any firm. It’s this desire to be higher up the Google rankings that has led to the explosion of the search engine optimisation (SEO) industry.
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Successive Google algorithm updates have seen the nature of SEO change radically. Where once processes such as keyword stuffing – cramming words that are popular in Google searches into your website’s copy, whether they make sense or not – may have worked, now they can actually work against you.

These algorithm updates, such as the exotically named Panda and Penguin, mean that now – as Bill Gates once famously said – “content is king”.

Meaningful content that operates as part of a wider digital marketing strategy, with the likes of social media and blogging all playing a part, is now key. The ability to view your site on smartphones is also gaining importance at an exponential rate.

But because of the rapid speed of change, there’s a feeling among experts that some small businesses are still getting it wrong.

“There seems to be a belief that if we cram keywords into content then this will push those all important rankings up,” says Sarah Duffy, MD of creative marketing agency Red Hen Creative.

When we approached Google, they said they don’t comment on SEO, and much of what’s under the bonnet is still the subject of supposition from the outside world.

One thing’s for sure though, Google is getting smarter. It’s now much harder to take shortcuts or to pull the wool over its eyes and cheat your way to the top – you have to earn your place.

But lack of time and writing expertise can prove hefty roadblocks for firms looking to evolve their content. A lack of patience too (SEO can take months to start showing any real impact) is also a problem.

Phil Morgan, head of search at advertising agency Delineo, says: “SEO results are only keenly felt long-term, and therefore it can be difficult for small business owners to see the value in taking time out of their day to write about their industry.”

He adds: “The online audience has evolved and expectations are high. They are mobile, they are time poor and they live in a world where sharing ideas and content on social networks is just a natural part of consuming online content.”

Cheshire-based wedding photographer Christopher Ian has seen first hand how much Google has changed.

“Google is my primary source of enquiries so it is of vital importance. When I first started my wedding photography website in 2011, I found that ranking well depended largely on key wording specific phrases,” he says. “I’d just put in a list of locations or photography styles, listed one after the other in a robotic style. But now Google will look for these words and phrases in the form of structured and real-world paragraphs that actually make sense, it is more human.”

So what options do businesses have if they want to get their SEO in order? Firstly, when it comes to creating content, it’s impossible to overstate the importance of being earnest – create content that’s enjoyable to read and genuinely relevant to your customers.

Duffy says: “Don’t stuff content with keywords – it’s just awful to read. Yes, you’ll probably boost rankings for a short time, until Google blacklists you, and in the interim once you do get a potential customer on your site, they’ll click off within seconds. People buy from people – be natural, be engaging, be human.”

Another tick in the plus column when Google is ranking you is if reputable websites link to you, and if people are talking about you online.

Leon Brown, founder of Nextpoint, which sells education services and content, says: “I use social media to engage in conversation with people, it’s also useful for opening opportunities.

“You can use it to refer people to your content as part of the conversations and find people who can share your content, such as retweeting on Twitter.”

Faced with a real lack of understanding about this rapidly changing industry, SEO experts and agencies are still highly sought after.

Alex Fenton, lecturer in digital business at Salford Business School, runs courses at MediaCityUK. He says: “A lot of SMEs come on our courses and quite often they will have had some kind of bad experience, either being ripped off by someone taking their money and not delivering results, or some kind of search engine penalty.”

Paul Delaney, head of natural search at Vizeum Manchester, adds: “To ensure no opportunities are missed, having the right team members focus on SEO and essentially learn through training will really help get the business on the right track.”
Five ways to improve your SEO

Create great content. Google’s reputation depends on it leading users to high quality sites, so the better and more original your content is, the more Google will like you.

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/small-business-network/2015/jul/27/master-seo-google-rankings-search

How To Plan An SEO Strategy That Will Work

SEO is the process of ranking your website on the search engines. It is important to develop an SEO strategy that will suit both your website and your business. It is actually very important to know what position your website holds and what to do to improve it.

There is no magic wand for SEO, there is no exact formula to follow, it is one of those things that if you try to grab it, it disappears. It does pay to be cautious with whatever optimisation techniques you decide to use. Any mistakes will result in penalties so you do need to be sure that what you do is legitimate and is within the rules.

So, planning an SEO strategy means that you need to know what your product is and who your target audience is. This is actually the first step, understanding what you sell and who you sell it to. This will give you the understanding that you need to begin formulating your strategy. You need to identify areas where your website is not performing so well on the search engines.

Keywords: Find out whether your target keywords are spread equally around your site. Keywords are still one of the main sources used to rank your site on the search engines.

Content: Content is more important than ever and it has to be unique, well written and contain a good density of keywords and key phrases that appear in a natural fashion.

Image Optimization: make sure that keywords are showing in the ALT Tags.

Google Analytics: Run Google analytics regularly so that you can see what is going on and where you can make improvements.

Index Status: It is vital that your site is crawled and indexed, if it is not, you will never rank on the search engines.

Check Backlinks: Find out how many back links your site has and make sure that they are to other high quality sites that are relevant to your website. Use Google’s disavow tool to remove unsuitable backlinks.
Social media status: Check your website’s social media status. It is important for businesses these days to engage with their followers so make sure you update these accounts regularly.

By checking all these points, you will be in a better place for developing your SEO strategy. Your business can have a prominent online profile which in turn lead to higher profits. Having a carefully planned and executed online marketing strategy will go a long way to achieving this.


Millions of blog posts are being written every day for various blogs across the web. One of the obvious facts that new bloggers learn quickly is that not all blogs and blog posts get equal attention. On a particular blog, some blog posts get more attention than others. There are some blog posts on this blog that always get more traffic than others. There are also some blogs that get more traffic than other ones. Out of all of the blogs I have, this one is by far the most successful.

The amount of traffic your blog gets is dependent on social media and SEO. Social media covers the sharing aspect and growing an audience on the networks you use. However, SEO is a much deeper concept that a select few understand. To everyone else, it looks like the extensive math problem that takes up the entire chalkboard.

Understanding SEO is important because it is a big avenue for traffic. Some people get thousands of daily visitors from SEO which means it is valuable. Although SEO is not exactly the do or die stage of a blog, it is important, and here are 11 mistakes you need to avoid so your blog can have better SEO.

#1: Not submitting your blog’s sitemap to Google.

One of the reasons why blog posts do not get SEO traffic is because they are not even indexed by Google. A sitemap presents all of the contents of your blog in a way that makes it easier for Google to read them. Submitting your blog’s sitemap to Google will allow them to properly index your blog posts. Indexing your blog posts on Google makes it possible for anyone to find any one of your blog posts with a particular search phrase.

There are many options for creating your own sitemap, but out of all of the options, the Google XML Sitemaps WP plugin is the easiest to use. This plugin makes it easy to create an XML sitemap to submit to Google so all of your blog posts can be properly indexed. Once you get your sitemap, head over to Google Webmaster Tools and submit your sitemap.

#2: Not knowing the difference between http and https

Actually, there is no difference, and that’s the problem. Search engines see http://www.example.com and https://www.example.com as two different websites with identical content. This is duplicate content that search engines associate with plagiarism. As a result, your SEO ranking will go down for both the http and https versions of your website.

In order for you to identify whether your blog has this problem or not, simply enter http:// before your blog’s URL. Then, do the same thing but with https:// in the front. When you do this, check your URL for spelling because you do not want a misspelled URL to give you the wrong webpage.

Your SEO is doing just fine if one of the two options worked. If both options work, then your blog’s SEO is getting hurt. For a WordPress blog, you can change your blog’s URL by going into settings–>general. Then, you can change your blog’s URL to your preference so people can either use http or https to access your blog. Visitors should not be able to use both http and https to access your blog.

#3: Not having meta tags for your blog posts

Search engines have a big responsibility in organizing billions of blog posts based on popularity, keywords, and value. Although search engines have this big responsibility, they struggle to understand a majority of blog posts. The reason why some valuable blog posts are not getting any search engine traffic is because they do not have meta tags.

I got introduced to meta tags more than a year and a half after I created this blog. I had to go through every blog post I ever wrote and add meta tags to them all. It was painstaking work that took several months of my time, but it was all worth it. My search engine traffic jumped up significantly after making the change. Any of my blog posts that were already doing good traffic from the search engines got a big jump in traffic.

I use the Add Meta Tags WP Plugin to add meta tags to all of my blog posts. I include keywords in these meta tags so search engines can pick up on them and promote my content. Meta tags, especially the meta tags with the right keywords, make it easier for the search engines to understand what your content is.

#4: Not understanding how Google sees your blog

Google sees your blog completely differently from you. It does not see the colors and pictures that may be on your blog posts. In order to make it easier for Google to see the way your blog looks, use the data highlighter in Google’s webmaster tools. Once you verify your blog, the data highlighter will allow you to let Google know how your blog looks (pictures, text, author name, etc). Using the data highlighter only takes 10-15 minutes, and it can have a big impact on your search engine traffic.

#5: Not improving your blog’s bounce rate

Your blog’s bounce rate allows search engines to identify how interesting your blog is. If your bounce rate is 100%, that means people are visiting your blog and then leaving without reading another article. A high bounce rate is bad for SEO and results in fewer conversions.

In order to see where your bounce rate is at, verify your blog with Alexa and then see their stats. Your blog’s bounce rate should be under 70%. A bounce rate under 70% means that at least 30% of your visitors are reading multiple articles on your blog. The lower you can get that bounce rate, the better your SEO and conversions will be.

You can lower your bounce rate through a variety of ways. Here are some of them:

Include links to your older blog posts in your new ones
Use Hello Bar to promote one of your articles, or better yet, a landing page
Show related articles at the bottom of every blog post
Show popular articles on your sidebar
Redirect people to another page on your blog after they subscribe. This page should contain links to the best content on your blog.
Show summaries of blog posts so people have to click (lowering bounce rate) to read the entire blog post

Most people do not see a sudden drop in their bounce rates. It takes a few weeks before seeing a significant drop in your bounce rate, and when I say significant drop, that usually means a 5-10% drop. Getting your bounce rate under 60% means you are moving in the right direction.

Read more at http://www.business2community.com/blogging/10-seo-mistakes-will-hurt-blogs-search-ranking-01280760#LQ697pB5LWihm3OY.99

Don’t Miss Out On Local Business When Planning Your SEO

These days it is more important than ever for businesses to have an online profile. This is not only a positive step for the business itself but also so that customers and potential customers can find them. For brick and mortar businesses the use of local SEO is essential as most people now use their smartphones to locate goods and services in their area. So, it makes perfect sense to make use of the internet to provide information about business location, goods and services offered, opening hours and so on. You do not even need to have a big fancy website either, there are plenty of free local business directories that you can use so that people can find you. The best thing is that your business can be any size to make use of local search engine optimisation strategies, so whether you have an office in your dining room or have branches all over the country, you too can obtain more business.

SEO covers a whole plethora of strategies that you can make use of to promote your business locally and that will increase your turnover. In the end, this is what it’s all about, increasing business and making more money. The one thing you do need to remember is that whatever techniques you use must be natural looking. It is vital that you do not fall foul of the rules and that you don’t force anything. You could write a blog that has local information on it and optimize that content so that it is relevant to your local area. Make sure you register your business with Google My Business, this will make sure that the search engine knows about your business and where it is located which means that it will feature when people are looking for whatever you offer in your area. Don’t discount social media, it can really help boost your local profile particularly if you are willing to spend a little bit of time interacting with your local followers. If you can exchange links with other relevant local firms, this can be a real gem because obtaining really good quality links can be extremely difficult these days. It is however, vital that you only link with businesses that have a common interest with yours, so for instance, if you own a pet supplies shop, you could link with the local veterinary surgery or boarding kennels and because they are not in the same niche, they are not competitors so you can help each other.

As I’ve already said, so many people now use smartphones to surf the net and in fact, it is believed that within a few years this number will overtake the numbers using laptops or desktop computers. Do not miss out on this opportunity, being left behind now will mean that you won’t catch up or will have missed out on so much potential business that your competitors will have overtaken you.


Local search engine optimization isn’t just about local mom-and-pop shops anymore. Practically any business can take advantage of local SEO’s benefits. Since Google’s fan-named “Pigeon” update in 2014, the importance of local SEO has grown, leading many entrepreneurs to focus on their strategy despite going years without considering a local tangent to their inbound marketing campaign. Others, who already practiced regular local optimization strategies, saw the update as an opportunity to increase their efforts even further.

These moves are savvy, because local SEO has risen in importance, but the ride isn’t over yet. Over the next few years, I anticipate that local SEO will become even more impactful and more useful for businesses. Here’s why.

Google loves local businesses.

Over the years, Google has shown slight favoritism toward newer, smaller, more agile companies. While most of its ranking biases have to do with a brand’s history and authority, Google also wants to give the people what they want — and that often means showcasing nimbler, more popular brands.

It also has to do with enabling small-business owners, who have limited access to resources, more potential in breaking new ground. Google has a long history of providing free tools — such as Analytics, Webmaster Tools and so on — to business owners for the sole purpose of helping them increase their online visibility. Because Google cares about (dare I say “loves”) local businesses, you can expect Pigeon to be only the beginning of its locally-focused updates.

There will be more individualized results.

Google also loves giving people individualized results. While its predictive and customized search features are relatively limited for the time being, already the search engine is able to generate specific results based on the person who is searching. As long as you’re logged into a Google account, your search history and your geographic location both play into the type of results you see.

As Google grows more sophisticated and users start demanding even more individualized results, the importance of local optimization will only grow.

The growth of mobile and wearable devices.

Each year, the percentage of online searches performed on mobile devices has grown definitively, and as you might imagine, the majority of mobile searches are performed while on the go. With the dawn of wearable devices, such as the Apple Watch, users will start using on-the-go searches even more frequently, with even more immediate needs.

As a result, proximity-based searches will likely start to become popular, and local searches will be based on hyper-specific locations, rather than just on a regional or neighborhood-specific basis. In effect, wearable devices will drive a much more geographically relevant network of information and eliminate even more barriers between the digital and physical worlds.

Competition is increasing.

Every year, millions of new sites are created and thousands of new businesses stabilize as formidable enterprises. In response, potential search visibility is actively dropping in many areas, with features such as the Knowledge Graph taking over search engine results pages and long-standing blue chip brands dominating the national search landscape.

Competition is increasing, so business owners will be forced to find smaller target niches in order to achieve relevant visibility. One of the most efficient ways to do this is to optimize locally, so local SEO will only grow in importance as competition continues to increase.

How to get started with a local SEO campaign.

If you’re intimidated by the notion of starting a local SEO campaign, don’t be. It’s actually a pretty straightforward process, though it will take you some time and effort.

Local citation correction. Your first job is to make sure your business is listed accurately and appropriately throughout the web. Claim your local business profile on local directory and review sites such as Yelp and TripAdvisor, as well as any other directories that are relevant for your business.

Read more here: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/247515

SEO in 2015 – What Has Changed and By How Much?

There is always a lot of talk about how SEO is changing all the time and to a degree this is true. It is however more about the change in quantity of each part of the ‘SEO Recipe’ than the addition of new factors. However saying that, new factors do arise and in 2015 three have been added to the list of factors that affect the rankings of a site, these being ‘Vertical Search’,  ‘Direct Answers’ and ‘HTTPS’.

Positive SEO Factors

The changes in the recipe are reflected by ‘movements, both positive and negative’ in the amount that each item is likely to affect any rankings. There is no doubt some truth to much of this, but the fact of the matter is that Google only uses any of its own rules as a guide to how it will rate a site, and often seems to list sites that, based on the rules that we know simply do not deserve that high page ranking.

It must also be said that the experiments / research that have led to the publication of the data and table below cannot be said to be totally scientific, for the simple reason that there are too many variables influencing  the rankings gained. However, saying all this, the data is useful and for my part seems to be following the path / trend of Semantic SEO.

Quality Content is Good for SEO

The first indication that this is the case comes in the very first part of the SEO Periodic Table, the ‘Cq’ (for Quality of the Content’) being give an +3 factor, the ‘symbol’ below, for Research into the Keywords that you want to rank for, also being given a +3. The latter I feel really relates to the fact that this research leads on to the inclusion of the ‘right’ words on a page, words that are relevant to the search term targeted AND ones that Google ‘expects to see’.

The latter point is an interesting by the way, as it is all about the ‘Reverse Engineering’ of web pages. The process is simple enough. You decide upon the target phrase, then discover the top sites on Google for that phrase and what words are found on the majority. It stands to reason then, that using the same words (as far as is possible and looks right) on a page on a site will increase the possibility of that page being ranked for the target phrase.

This is all music to the copy writers ears, as now, besides the target words, they are also provided with a list of words to use as well as an indication to which are the most important.

However, to get back to the SEO table,  we can see the words on the pages actually has its own symbol, the with a +2.

Other factors are ‘old’ ones, but with their ‘power’ updated to take into account how much they appear to affect rankings today in 2015. One that is especially interesting is the ‘Hd’ symbol (for Meta Description). This is indeed a factor that has been around for many years now, but today, it has another way of altering the rankings of its page.

This change stems from the ‘SEO Feedback Loop’ that Google is now suspected of running. Here the CTR (Click Through Rate) % of all the links on a Google SERPS result are checked, the idea being that if a page is listed but only gets a low CTR there must be something wrong with the way it is listed and this of course is the owners fault.

The owner can of course monitor low CTR by checking on Webmaster Tools (Now Google Search Console) and then make some changes (to the Meta Description) in order to boost the CTR. However, if they don’t and the pages CTR continues to be low,  the page may lose it’s SERP’s listing (or at least be demoted), thus the need to make sure it is right becomes obvious  and why the power of the Meta Description has been increased.

Mobile Friendly Sites

Another change is that of the symbol ‘Am’ for mobile. This has increased by 2 points as well, and of course refers to the need for all sites to be Mobile Friendly.

On the other hand, we have those factors that have a Negative effect on rankings, all the old favourites like ‘paid links’ (Vp) , Keyword Stuffing (Vs) and Spammy links (VI) being present.

As I say, it is the quantity of each component of recipe that changes, not the (for the most part at least) the actual components.

The article (and table) is a good read though and I’d recommend it, and thank the hardworking staff at SearchEngineLand for it too.

The latest version of Search Engine Land’s Periodic Table Of SEO Success Factors is now out. This is the third edition since we first launched our search engine optimization framework in 2011. Below, a rundown of what’s new and changed, as well as a reintroduction to the table.

The Table’s Goal & Philosophy

Our goal with the Periodic Table Of SEO is to help publishers focus on the fundamentals needed to achieve success with search engine optimization. This means it’s not about trying to list all 200 Google ranking factors or detail Google’s 10,000 subfactors. It’s not about trying to advise if keywords you want to rank for should go at the beginning of an HTML title tag or the end. It’s not about whether or not Facebook Likes are counted for ranking boosts.

Search Engine Land Periodic Table of SEO Success Factors


Instead, the table is designed to broadly guide those new to or experienced with SEO into general areas of importance. Title tags are generally important. Think about making sure they’re descriptive. Social sharing is often generally seen as good for SEO. Aim for social shares, without worrying about the specific network.

If you want to understand more about the philosophy of the table, read our posts from when the table debuted in 2011 and when it was updated in 2013.

What The SEO Table Covers

There are two major classes of factors:

On-The-Page: factors that are largely within the control of publishers
Off-The-Page: factors are influenced often by others or not directly tied to a publisher’s site
Within these two classes are seven categories of factors, which are:

Content – factors relating to the content and quality of your material
Architecture – factors about your overall site functionality
HTML – factors specific to web pages
Trust – factors related to how trustworthy & authoritative a site seems to be
Links – factors related to how links impact rankings
Personal – factors about how personalized search results influence rankings
Social – factors on how social recommendations impact rankings
Overall, there are 37 individual factors, which range from making use of descriptive HTML title tags to whether a site has success with visitor engagement. Here’s a close-up of the table, focusing on just the factors: