DIY SEO, is It Possible and is it a Good Idea?

The world of SEO is quite complicated to get your head around, but once you have the basics under your belt, there is no doubt that anyone can do SEO, you just need the training, time and tools, at least that is my view and effects how we approach discussions with potential customers in that where they so have the time, we always suggest that they do as much as they can.

The problem we come across more often than not though is that they don’t have the time to do SEO, just as much as they don’t have the time to do their own accounts.

But for some, the idea of doing their own SEO is really appealing, and for them being able to obtain resources from the web is really great. We are therefore really pleased to be able to point people at this page.

Is do-it-yourself (DIY) search engine optimization (SEO) possible if you lack SEO experience?

“DIY SEO is not just possible, it’s usually preferable,” according to Eric Ward, a noted linking strategist and publisher of the Linkmoses Private newsletter. “Nobody will care as much about your business as you.”

Whether you’re a small business owner or an online marketer at a large company looking to enhance your SEO, the most important thing is to “recognize that the techniques and tactics a DIY SEO’er must use are not universal,” Ward says. “A site that sells hand-carved boomerangs requires different SEO techniques and tactics than a site that sells bobsled parts. While there are some technical aspects to SEO that are common, the ultimate success or failure of your site will be based on SEO and promotion strategies that differentiate you from everyone else.”

We’ve grouped the following 25 invaluable DIY tips from SEO experts into four categories: Keywords, Links, Blogging and Social Media, and Strategies. (Click the links to jump directly to additional sections.) A few of the recommendations may be beyond your technical reach, but understanding the concepts will help you work more effectively with SEO professionals.

Click the link for the full story on DIY SEO

30% of retailers see SEO agencies as “expensive” and unable to deliver

It’s always interesting to see what comments make about SEO, it is after all a difficult task and one where you just cannot promise good results. Any SEO company will try their best of course (within the budget they are allowed), but with Google ‘making things up as they go along’ (or at least that is what it often feels like) it can be very very difficult to get the results the customer wants.

That said, there is also the issue of what the customer does want and the question ‘Can the website deliver’, even when traffic is delivered. This is a point taken up by some of the people commenting on the blog below, as they point out that some companies simply believe that they deserve a first page position and to ‘sell’ whilst not really understanding what Google and their customers want.

The former point is one that really demands understanding, as a good site in Google’s eyes is one that does not just ‘sell’, but provides good and useful content to visitors. It is also worth pointing out that it is indeed foolish to openly trick Google, but that does not mean that some fancy SEO footwork cannot bring some good results…

Please read the item below and if you want to see the full article on SEO Agencies and Results click on the link:-

Nearly a third (32 per cent) of UK retailers see organic search (SEO) agencies as “expensive” and unable to offer them clear results while 15 per cent find them disappointing, according to research from OneHydra.

Of the 200 retail e-commerce managers and marketing directors questioned the majority (82 per cent) said search marketing is an integral part of their business model but on average less than 20 per cent of their SEO requirements were met in the last 12 months.
It was found that most work with an agency in some capacity, either in partnership with their own in-house team (37 per cent) or exclusively (37 per cent). Only a quarter handle SEO in-house.

David Freeman, head of SEO at Havas Media, said he often hears businesses and marketing teams discuss the difficulties of getting SEO projects implemented.
“However, we must consider that development teams normally have a continuous stream of work to implement and changes for the greater good of SEO performance won’t get implemented by default,” he said.

“SEO teams need to understand the way their clients/internal teams operate and accompany SEO recommendations with a clear commercial case.”
Freeman explained this commercial case should allow work to be prioritised accordingly and alleviate some of this wastage. However, he added that it is “vital” that SEO teams understand the capabilities and limitations of the content management systems to ensure that the recommended changes are feasible to start with.

Meanwhile 17 per cent of respondents stated that the lack of a “strong business case” was the key reason for being unable to implement changes, but by far the biggest barrier for companies was “technological resource and capacity”, a problem which 71 per cent of respondents cited.
Andrew Girdwood, head of media innovation at DigitasLBi, said it is a shame that so many sites are still built without SEO in mind.
“An approach that blends media savvy, like SEO, with brilliant design and build capabilities should not be seen as a luxury but as a necessity for brands. The approach helps save money in the long term.”

Regarding spend, the research found that a quarter of retailers could be wasting more that £100,000 a year on failed SEO procedures, of which many don’t even make it through the IT Department.

However, Oscar Romero, head of search strategy and product at Starcom MediaVest, said this figure is difficult to quantify due to changes implemented by Google.

“Since Google began restricting visibility of keyword data in 2011 under the (not provided) label, businesses have been denied fundamental information about how their sites were performing in organic search. As Google further increases online security measures, the proportion of keyword data being labelled as (not provided) is reaching close to 100 per cent. With this lack of visibility on keyword-level performance, businesses are faced with the significant challenge of how to assess ROI and justify future investment in SEO.

“Over time the industry has developed a variety of alternative methods to define SEO metrics and targets, including analysis of rankings and landing page performance.

“However this is not able to replace the level of data previously available to search marketers and renders the ability to assess the performance of SEO in isolation very challenging.”